Tea Giving: Day 18 (Cinnamon Rooibos)

 

pearl_CinnamonRooibosDay18

Not all cinnamons are created equal.


There are two types: True Cinnamon (Ceylon) and Cassia Cinnamon. The later being more common and what you find on supermarket shelves. But it’s really True Ceylon Cinnamon that we love and use in our blends.

Cinnamon is made by cutting the stems of cinnamon trees. The inner bark is then extracted and the woody parts removed. As its drying the strips of bark curls into rolls which are cinnamon sticks which can then be ground into cinnamon powder. That famous cinnamon aroma is caused by the oily part of the bark and is high in a compound called cinnamaldehyde, AND THAT is cinnamons secret weapon for wellness.

Here are a few things you can expect from cinnamon:

  • Loaded with Antioxidants and polyphenols to protect your body from oxidative damage caused by free radicals. It’s considered a superfood and outranked garlic and oregano in antioxidant levels.
  • May cut the risk of heart disease and has been been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease.
  • Helps with type 2 diabetes: 1 gram or about half a teaspoon of cinnamon per day has been shown to have beneficial effects on blood markers.
  • Reduces levels of “bad” cholesterol, the LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while keeping the “good” HDL cholesterol stable. 120 mg per day of cinnamon increased “good” HDL cholesterol levels.
  • Cinnamon can improve sensitivity to the hormone insulin, the key hormones that regulate metabolism, energy use and is essential for transporting blood sugar from your bloodstream to your cells. It can also dramatically reduce insulin resistance.
  • Has a powerful anti-diabetic effect and can lower blood sugar by decreasing the amount of glucose that enters your bloodstream after eating by interfering with numerous digestive enzymes, which slows the breakdown of carbohydrates in your digestive tract. It can also mimick insulin which improves glucose uptake by your cells, though it acts much slower than insulin itself.
  • Beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, both of which are a progressive loss of the structure and function of brain cells.
  • Helps right bacterial and fungal infections, treat respiratory tract infections and can also inhibit the growth of certain bacteria, including Listeria and Salmonella. Its antimicrobial effects of cinnamon may also help prevent tooth decay and reduce bad breath.

That’s quite a list of reasons to include cinnamon in your diet. And we haven’t even talked about how good it tastes. Especially when blended into a Tea or Rooibos.

The natural sweetness of a true cinnamon comes as a shock to people when they taste Cinnamon Rooibos. “Surely, you’ve sweetened it with sugar?” is what I’m always asked. The answer is always, “Nope.”

I’ve lost track of how many people love this blend. Especially due to the fact that it helps with sugar cravings – especially at night – that time of day when you just want to pop on Netflix or Hulu and dig into a sleeve of cookies. Is this the cure for late night sugar cravings? Indeed. A cuppa Rooibos Cinnamon and you immediately forget what you were digging for in the cupboard. That’s quite a mighty endorsement and tells you how powerful this blend is.

Today is Day 18 of our 25 Days of Tea Giving which means that today you get to enjoy 25% OFF our Cinnamon Rooibos. Just use code TEAGIVING25 at checkout on the website.

Happy (low sugar) Sipping!
~The Chief Leaf

Tea Giving: Day 18 (Cinnamon Rooibos)

Healing Heart Tonic

rose tea

Say Hello to District Blend #02: Brookland!

Welcome to the little hamlet where Pearl Fine Teas was born almost 11 years ago. To honor this lovely part of Washington DC, I’m finally introducing the newest member to the Pearl Fine Teas family: Healing Heart Tonic.


But first, a little about Brookland:

“Brookland evolved in the early 1870s, when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad ran its western branch line through this area. The rail line was situated alongside a fine 1840 Greek Revival farmhouse known as the Brooks Mansion, home of Colonel Jehiel Brooks. In the late 1880s, Catholic University was established just north of Colonel Brooks’ farm. Developers quickly responded, creating a new Washington neighborhood beyond the central city and taking its name from Colonel Brooks. The university provided a centerpiece for a large number of Catholic institutions.

In the early days, Brookland, with its single-family, wood-frame houses in styles ranging from Queen Anne to Craftsman – attracted government workers, Smithsonian Institution scientists, and people of many ethnic backgrounds who shared the Catholic faith. In the 1930s, Brookland attracted affluent African Americans looking for an area that was not restricted to whites only. Of particular note are 13 International style houses designed by Hilyard Robinson and Howard H. Mackey, two of Washington’s most prominent African American architects of the era. Robinson was responsible for the Ralph Bunche house, 1510 Jackson Street, NE, built for the Nobel Peace Prize winner.

Many other prominent black Washingtonians made their home here, including the entertainer Pearl Bailey, the poet Sterling Brown, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Robert Weaver, Senator Edward Brooke, and historian Rayford Logan. Brookland enjoys an interesting history of civic activism. Most recently it rescued the Brooks Mansion, which still stands near the Brookland Metro station, a symbol of this community and its heritage.”


This neighborhood is located in the Northeast section of DC and is known informally as “Little Rome” due to the influence of the Catholic Church and home to Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

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Rose garden at the Franciscan Monestery

I first discovered this little enclave back in 2003 – a hidden gem, devoid of trend and pretension. I loved the diversity of people, the loving warm-hearted neighbors, the chirping birds, the stunning green spaces with gardens galore – and the gorgeous refuge of the Franciscan Monastery where you often see a Monk or Nun strolling in deep contemplation and reflection. A quiet walk through the rose garden instantly infuses a sense of peace and puts all things in perfect perspective. As a member of the Franciscan Garden Guild, I’ve spent time in the greenhouse, helping with the famous yearly Plant Sale and even learned how to extract honey from the bees they keep.

My neighborhood has inspired me in so many ways – mostly notably with the profound friendships I’ve made living here that have touched and warmed my heart – specifically my good friend Bill. He is no longer with us, but I had the privilege of being his next door neighbor for 14 years.  We had a lot of fun during those years and he taught me a thing or 10 about everything from how to install a light fixture to how to navigate some of life’s steeper slopes. It was a joyful friendship and one I deeply cherish. It’s also why I wanted to create a blend that reflected and honored that special friendship – which was born right here in Brookland.

Bill was a Deacon in his Church; He loved roses, and chewing on lemon grass and good ole’ fashioned ginger root. The Brookland Healing Heart Tonic is a blend of  those 3 ingredients and is totally caffeine free, healing, and heart warming. Besides the emotional healing benefits of this tisane, there are also many actual health benefits to this wellness tonic:


herbal rose tea.

Rose: 
• Naturally uplifting (especially for those prone to feeling down or depressed)
• Regulates hormone levels (how the neurotransmitters in our brain are regulated)
• Can help to improve liver function and increase urination (natural diuretic)
• Releases toxins from the body
• Good source of Vitamin C (improves immunity)
• May also help treat arthritis, menstrual cramps, cold/flu, digestive issues, and insomnia


Lemon Grass. Cymbopogon citratus. Capim Limao, Santo.Lemon grass:
• Traditionally used to help control and normalize heart rate and for high blood pressure.
• Used for the treatment of depression and anxiety
• Anti-bacterial and Anti-fungal
• Loaded with Vitamin C (improves immunity)
• Citral is the active constituent and lemon grass has the highest concentration of it compared to any other plant in the world. Citral has antioxidant and anti-tumor properties that both benefit the brain.


Isolated gingerGinger:
• Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Fungal
• Boots Immunity
• Aids digestion and relief from nausea
• Improves heart disease risk factors
• May lower Cholesterol
• May have powerful anti-diabetic properties
• Can lead to significant reductions in LDL cholesterol and blood triglyceride level (similar extent as the cholesterol-lowering drug atorvastatin)
• Studies show its effective at reducing symptoms of osteoarthritis
• Can protect against age-related damage to the brain (Alzheimers) and can also improve brain function in elderly women



Healing Heart Tonic (District Blend #02: Brookland)
will debut at markets on:

• Saturday, May 5th: Falls Church Farmers Market, VA  (8am – Noon)
• Saturday, May 5th:  Monroe Street Farmers Market, Brookland DC  (9am – 1:00 pm)
• Sunday, May 6th:  Central Farm Market in Bethesda, MD (9am – 1:30pm)
• You can also purchase online in the Tea Shop here.

“There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart.” ~ Charles Dickens
“Happy Sipping!” ~The Chief Leaf

 

Healing Heart Tonic

Tea Kindness #01: Blueberry Rooibos

Blueberry Bliss Rooibos Tea.
Blueberry Rooibos

Welcome to December and the first Friday of the last month of the year. We’re only 8 days out from Thanksgiving and it seemed appropriate to kick things off with Blueberry Rooibos Tisane – given how important blueberries were to settlers from England. Why no one associates blueberries with that American holiday is a mystery to me. Here’s a little blueberry history:

During the 17th century, (when ships landed in the New World) settlers started to colonize and clear land for farming so that they could grow food to survive. Since the New World had a very different terrain (and climate) successful farming was difficult. It wasn’t until 1620, when Wampanoag Indians stepped in and taught the Pilgrims new skills to help them survive. This included planting corn, foraging, gathering native plants and how to find, dry and store blueberries for winter. That mighty berry actually became a critical food source; and a beverage made of blueberries became a major staple during the Civil War.

But blueberries go father back then just the 17th Century.  Botanists estimate them to be the oldest living thing on earth: around 13,000 years old. In comparison, according to Chinese legend, the history of tea began in 2737 B.C.E.

If you are a blueberry fan, as I am, you will love this Tisane. (Remember a Tisane is what you call herbs, spices and rooibos – which isn’t actually Tea.) The green and red rooibos base blended with dried blueberries is fantastic hot and also over ice. Its a great tea for children to enjoy or anyone that is sensitive to caffeine. It’s got a desert-like quality to it and a natural sweetness without any added sugar.

Rooibos has so many health benefits which I discussed in past posts, but here is a top 10 List:

  1. Naturally caffeine free–recommended for people suffering from irritability, headaches, insomnia, hypertension, nervous tension and mild depression.
  2. Rich in antioxidants that boost the body’s immune system.
  3. May help slow the ageing process.
  4. Anti-spasmodic, thus relieving stomach cramps
  5. Low in tannins–won’t impair the absorption of iron and protein in the body.
  6. Helpful for the relief of stomach/digestive problems like nausea, heartburn, stomach ulcers and constipation.
  7. Anti-allergic–has a soothing effect on irritated skin when directly applied to the affected area.
  8. Free of oxalic acid; safe for people suffering from kidney stones.
  9. Beneficial in the management of allergies like hay fever, asthma & eczema.
  10. High in minerals, complementing our daily intake of iron, calcium, magnesium & zinc; needed for maintaining a healthy immune system.

If you are new to Rooibos, this blend is a nice introduction. From today, Dec 1 through Dec 7th, please enjoy an added discount on our Blueberry Rooibos by using code: RATK20 at checkout!

** Remember to follow along on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram because someone will be chosen randomly to receive this tea for free during our Random Acts of (Tea) Kindness Initiative this month.

Happy Sipping!
~The Chief Leaf

Tea Kindness #01: Blueberry Rooibos

Pumpkin Pressure?

Kettle in the form a pumpkin on background of burlap
Pumpkin Teapot

I gave in. It took 10 years, but I finally caved. Pearl Fine Teas now offers a Pumpkin Flavored Tea. Don’t get me wrong, I like pumpkins. I put a few on my front porch every year (I prefer the really ugly ones) and I love pumpkin seeds. I even like (on occasion) roasted pumpkin, but I have never taken to pumpkin flavored foods or drinks. Not my cup of tea so to speak.

So what happened? I blame Linus Van Pelt.  His love and passion for that squash has stayed with me since the first time watching in as a kid. I love the name, hence the blend. And we now have a very limited quantity of our very own Great Pumpkin Tea Blend.

GreatPumpkin
Linus

It’s technically a tisane (herbal) because the base in Rooibos. If you follow this blog regularly then you already know about Rooibos and its mega health benefits including but not limited to the fact that its 100% Caffeine Free. So its totally safe for kids and anyone else who needs to stay clear of caffeine. The blend combines a mixture of warming spices including cinnamon which adds a touch of sweetness to it naturally. We tested it out at our Sunday Farmers Market in Bethesda, and those to tasted a sample, love it!

If you are on the pumpkin train, love all things pumpkin and want to try a healthy, low calorie, no sugar drink: The G21764954_10154931976793015_5255868319009802685_n-1reat Pumpkin is for you. You can have a look and purchase on our website under Seasonal + Specials. I’m offering a 10% off discount to anyone reading and subscribed to this blog. Just enter GP10 at checkout. There is a very limited supply and once it’s gone, we won’t be bringing out until… next year?

I  think everyone should drink a cuppa Great Pumpkin Tea while watching the Great Pumpkin rise from the patch this year when it airs on TV.

Happy Fall! Happy Sipping!

~ The Chief Leaf

 

 

 

Pumpkin Pressure?

25 Days of Tea: Day 13 (Full Moon Water)

fullmoonteapot2As I was thinking about what tea to discuss for today, it occurred to me that talking about rituals around tea seemed timely. So, I’m detouring during our 25 Days of Tea adventure to talk about a ritual of making Full Moon Water during this full moon phase which is today, December 13, 2016. It’s the last Super Moon of the year called the Full Cold Moon, and right before the Winter Solstice. Seems like perfect timing.

Websters definition of ritual is:
1 : of or relating to rites or a ritual :  ceremonial <a ritual dance>
2 :  according to religious law <ritual purity>
3 :  done in accordance with social custom or normal protocol <ritual handshakes> <ritual background checks>

But I like this one: “a sequence of activities involving gestures, words, and objects, performed in a sequestered place, and performed according to set sequence.”

Rituals often bring a sense of comfort, serenity and peace. (Who doesn’t want that). And as we know, rituals and tea go hand in hand. It dates back thousands of years in almost every tea culture. The Japanese tea ceremony, the Gong Fu Chinese tea ceremony, Korean tea ceremony, even the British “ceremony” of teatime affords us the gift of being present and connecting to those we are sharing tea with, our surroundings, nature and most importantly: ourselves. You can read a very interesting article by Richard Carrico in Cultural Anthropology that outlines the concept of ritual. He writes that “Ritual is in fact an inevitable component of culture, extending from the largest-scale social and political processes to the most intimate aspects of our self-experience.”

One ritual that may not be widely known is that of charging water. And since water is as important as tea, this seemed very interesting to me. I’m not sure where it originated (it may be Shaman) and it may sound bit hocus pocus but what the heck. Things thrive under the warmth and light of the sun, so why not the moon? Let’s give it a shot tonight during this last Supermoon and see if we can infuse some good positive vibes into our cuppa and ourselves.

Here’s how it works:

The idea is to take fresh water (without any chemicals) and place it in a glass or crystal bowl and set it either on your window sill to catch the moon rays, or outside (covered with a light plastic wrap to keep out bugs and debris). You leave it there all night. The water is said to be charged in the morning with positive energy having collected the light from the full moon. Some say it even tastes different. Let’s find out by making Full Moon Water tonight and then making our tea in it tomorrow.  Perhaps we’ll feel energized. Perhaps calm and serene. Or maybe we won’t feel anything, but we will have tried something different that involves tea, and that in itself could turn into a ritual: always trying something new.

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Recovery Herbal Blend

Though I already wrote a post about our Recovery Blend in November and the components of the blend, I’m going to offer it up for today’s special since an herbal remedy seems to be right on target for our full moon water experiment.

If you are interested in giving it a try, please visit the Pearl Fine Teas tea shop today and use code: 25TEAS13 at checkout to get 25% off our Recovery Blend – today only!

If you have a particular tea ritual, I’d love to hear about it.

Happy Sipping!
-The Chief Leaf

#tealove
#teaunites
#teasaveslives
#sipteafeelhappy
#TeaTent
#teainDC
#teainVA
#teainMD
#25Teas
#fullmoon
#supermoon
#recoveryblend
#herbal
#tisane

#pearlfineteas

 

 

 

25 Days of Tea: Day 13 (Full Moon Water)

25 Days of Tea: Day 11 (Ginger Lemon)

gingerlemon.jpegGinger Lemon tisane, is one of our most popular herbal infusions that is regularly sold out due to demand. So in other words: Get it while its hot (and on sale)!

This blend is a combination of strong ginger root, lemongrass, and a sprinkle of linden. Many people find tremendous relief from everything from sore throats to the common cold with this powerful trifecta of herbs. Here is a little breakdown of some of the properties of each ingredient:

1. Ginger root: Spicy, peppery flavor, anti-inflammatory, aids nausea, loss of appetite, motion sickness and pain. Boosts immunity and has been known to protect against certain types of cancers, especially ovarian (Dr. Liu/University of Michigan).
2. Lemongrass: lemony, tart, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, helps digestive tract spasms, high blood pressure, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion.
3. Linden:  earthy, detox, aids colds/flu, inflammation, indigestion, helps with anxiety, natural sedative, heart support.

Here are some notes on this herbal blend:

• Overview:   Powerful healing blend known to aid wellness and recovery from illnesses like sore throats and colds.
• Dry Leaf:    Mixture of herbs including dried ginger root, lemongrass stalks and linden.
• Liquor (liquid):    Very pale yellow
• Aroma:   Ginger is upfront and the lemongrass wafts in the background
• Flavor notes:    It’s got a nice peppery kick from the ginger root and yet is easy to sip. The tart lemongrass is a nice compliment to the ginger. Smooth.
• Brewing recommendation:     Rolling boil / 212° Fº / 5+ minutes.
• Caffeine: No

If you are interested in giving this herbal infusion a try, please visit the Pearl Fine Teas tea shop today and use code: 25TEAS11 at checkout to get 25% of Ginger Lemon– today only!

Happy Sipping!
-The Chief Leaf

#tealove
#teaunites
#teasaveslives
#sipteafeelhappy
#TeaTent
#teainDC
#teainVA
#teainMD
#25Teas
#gingerlemon
#herbal
#infusion
#wellness

25 Days of Tea: Day 11 (Ginger Lemon)

TEA. A Magazine… “Drinks for Change”

teamagcover57web
Cover of TEA. A Magazine.

Happy New Year, TeaPeeps™. Here we are in the middle of January, and this only my second blog post. Where has the time gone? You’ll be happy to know I’ve been sipping and sampling some very nice teas these last few weeks. I’m a lucky TeaGirl!

Ok, so the big news for the new year is that our “Drink for Change” Obama Blend tea has made it to  TEA. A MAGAZINE. Yep you will see it, yet again, on the cover of the Winter 2009 Issue. Thanks to Pearl Dexter, Editor/Publisher for approaching us! She has also featured a little story about us and Jack Cheng on Page 28.  See what one little Twitter can do? If you haven’t already picked up your issue, scurry on out and scoop up a copy. This issue could sell out quickly! I believe it hits news stands… any second. History making cover? Yes. Amazing tea illustration? Absolutely. Tasty tea blend? You will love it.

page28obama1
Page 28 - January 2009 Winter Issue

Blend Info:
Order Drink for Change! $15.50 (3 oz)

Let me be absolutely clear, this organic African Red Bush Rooibos based tea has Honeybush, Pineapple, Papaya, Ginger, Rose petals and Cornflowers. It’s smooth, fresh and lacks bitterness. Environmentally friendly, unexpected, and a little left of center. Contributes to your overall well being and Health(care). Steep for 3-5 minutes and enjoy. Caffeine Free!

*10% of each sale will go to the Washington Humane Society
** Tea illustration by Jack Cheng

Here’s to our new President Barack Obama (let’s send him positive energy) and the beginning of living and sipping change!

TEA. A Magazine… “Drinks for Change”